How to build large resin models to last

2017-10-13 Khaiell

Every year, once the summer came, my warhound titan's resin legs were turning soft and the whole model plummeted from the shelf to his doom of thousand shards. I stoped this cycle using these four techniques

More tagged: forgeworld · resin · titan
How to build large resin models to last

1. Epoxy glue needs a rough surface to latch onto something

Each time the model broke I noticed a lot of surfaces that were covered with glue came up shining fresh like fresh from the mould. The glue just peeled off!

On the other hand the surfaces that were scratched or uneven held tight even after a 6 feet fall. This is why this time I used sandpaper and a drill to help the glue. Epoxy filling the holes forms natural, automatic pins.

2. The flimsy legs were impaled with spokes

I purchased especially long drill bits (10cm/4" long at 2mm width) to make holes across entire leg sections, including joints glued to them. Then I ran solid bicycle spokes through the holes, forming steel "bones" of the titan.

3. Plastic horseshoes eased the strain on the toes

Previously the entire weight of the titan was transferred to the table through legs and toes. The latter were made from a softer resin which made them even more susceptible to "summer softening". I added some plasticard pads to the bottom of the feet to make the model lean on these "horseshoes" instead of its toes.

You may notice the horseshoes are not evenly placed. This is because I was very careful to keep the balance of the model and make it stay straight. This required the plates to be off-centre a bit.

4. Flimsy, non-bearing joints were magnetized not glued

During the summer falls of the titan, its leg armour was breaking off together with a thin joint it was glued to. This will be no longer a problem as the armour is magnetized and will simply and safely detach under pressure.

Read more about the magnetization as an alternative to pinning

See the pictures as separate pages: How to build large resin models to last

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